Contents

Lots of conjecture out their about magazine monopodding. There is plenty of debate over whether it will cause magazine related stoppages. I found, with my two rifles, that the issue of stoppages could be related to not only the rifle, but the brand of magazines.

Magazine Monopod: Malfunction Maker?

Magazine Monopod: Malfunction Maker?Lots of conjecture out their about magazine monopodding. There is plenty of debate over whether it will cause magazine related stoppages. I found, with my two rifles, that the issue of stoppages could be related to not only the rifle, but the brand of magazines. What are the distinguishing features of a rifle that will have failures when mono-podding vs one that will function fine? An Easy Way to Stabilize the Shot Monopodding the mag is a quick and easy way to stabilize the shot. Recently it has gained more and more popularity judging by discussions on ar15.com and m4carbine.net. The crux of the argument belies the old military “doctrine” of never-resting the rifle on the magazine. Various posters report thousands of rounds on a monopodded magazine and they will report the stability benefits of doing so. Others report failures to feed. I examined my rifles to judge the suitability of monopodding the magazines and came to a few conclusions. 1) Monopodding success or failure depends on the magazine, magazine well, and also the magazine release of an individual weapon 2) One rifle may have many issues with monopodding the magazine while other rifles will have zero issues Where do the issues lie? Testing Your Rifle, Testing Your Mags I have two rifles. PSA and a Maine manufactured Bushmaster. The PSA is a flat top DD upper with a Rainier Arms mil-spec bolt and carrier. The Bushy has an surplus FN A2 upper with a Windham Weaponry bolt carrier and a Mil-Spec bolt. I have three types of magazines. USGI with Magpul Follower, Magpul PMAG Gen 2, and Magpul PMAG gen 3 . When you mono-pod the mag you are applying upward pressure on the magazine and the magazine release. If the magazine and rifle both meet the wrong criteria the feed lips of the magazine will scrape against the bottom of the bolt when applying this upward pressure. Place your favorite magazine brand into rifle. Press rifle down on to magazine with decent weight. Hold down magazine catch with thumb. Cycle charging handle. Did you feel any resistance? The USGI has the thinnest feedlips and did not affect function in the flat top or A2. The PMAG gen 2 with the thicker feedlips scraped the bolt carrier of my flat top, but not my A2. PMAG gen 3 was the worst offender. This was interesting since the Gen 3 has Mag-well stops molded into the mag. The Gen 3 scrapes the bottom of the bolt heavily on both my A2 and flat top rifle when applying monopod pressure. I removed the follower and spring from the magazines and repeated the test. Same results. P-Mags can introduce some friction into the feeding system. What About the Rifle? Factors that are in play here, I suspect, are magazine well tolerance since magazines can wiggle fore and aft (which could elevate the rear of the mags feedlips into scraping the bolt carrier), and magazine button / magazine catch placement. The PSA has more wiggle in the magazine catch assembly then the Bushmaster. It is miniscule difference, but with all the other factors combined it may be contributing.  Will problems be immediately apparent with your setup? That too depends… “It works fine” So where does the extra friction lie in the reliability equation? I shot my fully loaded Gen 3 Pmags while monopoding. I pushed down heavily on to the rifle. I had no malfunctions. The velocity of the bolt carrier and a strong buffer spring were able to overcome the resistance of the feed-lips scraping the bottom of the bolt… but what if things get dirty? Perhaps you take a carbine class and the oil, dirt, and burnt powder start to increase the viscosity of your oil. The bolt carrier slows down a bit due to the grime, powder, and thicker oil. Then you go prone and monopod the mag. You fire one shot and then possibly a Failure to feed . I didn’t put a 500-600 rounds down range at the last range session I went too, so I couldn’t test the Gen 3 Pmag further than that. For now I will stick with USGI magazines. Perhaps I will start investing in L plates as well. The NHMTG USGI mags have been 100 % in both my rifles so I will continue to buy these magazines along with Magpul followers. Some things to consider are that the mag catch area stamped out of the mag may fatigue over time and eventually the aluminum feed-lips may start scraping the bolt carrier. If that happens time to trash the magazine. Time to start numbering magazines to keep track of trouble mags in the future. I love PMAGs, but I won’t work them into my routine for shooting off the magazine monopod. I think I am asking for a malfunction. The stability advantage of shooting from monopod prone is great enough that I will use USGI mags for now. Wrapping Up Individual weapons and setups are wholly unique. Different magazines and unique rifles could deliver an equation that is unreliable under the right circumstances. It is important to test different components and find something that works well for you. My rifles like USGI magazines and the bonus is I can monopod off the magazine without introducing reliability issues. While I didn’t failures with the Magpul products during my limited testing, I feel the feed-lips scraping the bottom of the bolt carrier while monopoding will lead to reliability issues. I have learned my rifle can tolerate a magazine monopod with USGI mags. I will invest in some L plates to use this technique on hard and soft surfaces. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

The Mossberg 590: A Sturdy and Reliable Shotgun

The Mossberg 590: A Sturdy and Reliable Shotgun

Shotguns have long been considered the equivalent of the popular kid in school when it comes to personal defense weapons that civilians have access to and they still seem to pretty much be the gold standard for self-defense. The Mossberg 590 is a prime example of a reliable and powerful shotgun and it comes in a few different versions that focus on several aspects that gun purchasers might be interested in when looking for a shotgun to acquire. I thought a quick Mossberg 590 review might help you with some important information you need to consider before getting one, so let’s have a look at what this shotgun can do. The Mossberg 590 A1 is one of the most popular models of pump action shotguns available for self-defense at the moment. It is only one of several variations on this type of shotgun alongside other 20” barrel 9 round capacity models like the Mossberg 590 Special Purpose, the Mossberg 590 Tactical and the Mossberg 590 Mariner. It originated from the Mossberg 500 series and it was the only pump shotgun to ever pass a very strict endurance test conducted by the U.S. Military and conform to the Mil-Spec 3443 standards. After it passed a 300 round endurance test that allowed very little room for malfunctions and errors, the Mossberg 590 A1 went on to be adopted by the U.S. Army, Navy, Coast Guard as well as by several Special Forces units. It has also been issued to several state and federal agencies and police departments across the United States. So that can pretty much make it clear just how reliable this shotgun is, especially considering it’s been just as popular since it was first approved back in the 1980s. Mossberg 500 vs 590 Let’s have a quick look at what makes the Mossberg 590 a great shotgun. The 590 A1 has two action bars attached which help move the bolt and a single bolt lug which connects to a steel barrel-extension chamber. It offers the possibility to easily remove the trigger group by removing one pin in order to clean it if needed. It has a tubular magazine that connects to the receiver and that has the barrel collared to it and held in place by a cap. It features both top-tang safety and bolt release controls and has the extension and the barrel connected and button-drawn to the cylinder bore. The Mossberg 590 typically uses 12 gauge ammunition and can be compatible with 3” shells, with the Mossberg 590 A1 fitting both 3” and 2 ¾ “shells. The Mossberg 590 barrel is 20” long and the shotgun can hold 9 rounds in the internal magazine. But referring back to the Mossberg 590 vs 500 debate, it would seem that the 590 models are sturdier than their 500 counterparts and have a different build to them, with a focus on all metal parts. When it comes to the Mossberg 590 A1 there is also a heavy wall barrel that ensures even more durability. And you want to focus on durability for a weapon designed to perform well in rough environments. When it comes to the Mossberg 590 A1 there is also a heavy wall barrel that ensures even more durability. And you want to focus on durability for a weapon designed to perform well in rough environments. Mossberg 590 vs 590A1 When you narrow it down to the specifics, it would seem that the Mossberg 590 A1 is the ultimate model for military use since it shows off a few unique characteristics. Besides the heavy wall barrel, we can also discuss differences in Mossberg 590 accessories that each model can be equipped with. The 590A1 comes fitted with a M7 bayonet that can double as a combat knife but there are some Mossberg 590 bayonet models that will not be compatible with the 590 A1 shotgun since the bayonet lug that the M7 connects to is not identical to lugs found on several other riffles. Since the Mossberg 590 A1 was designed primarily for military use it should come as no surprise that it is one of the most reliable shotguns out there. But as is the case with most good things, it comes with a price and that price is, in this case, weight. It’s quite a heavy firearm to carry for long distances in rough terrain if you’re not very physically fit as it weighs about 7.5 pounds unloaded and measures in at 41” in length. When it comes to the Mossberg 590 pistol grip the A1 model features a firm recoil pad that will come in handy when you fire it since it’s got quite a kick to it. You can have your pick from several available factory installed SpeedFeed stocks but if you like to fire it often and want something that absorbs and reduces the recoil even more you can replace the original stock with one that fits your requirements. Specifics on the Mossberg 590 When it comes to ammo it can basically handle whatever you throw at it depending on how much power you need, but just because it has great features doesn’t mean you don’t have to practice shooting it. The A1 has a Picatinny rail-mounted ghost-ring sight on the rear and an AR-style fiber optic front sight. These features both help with the aim and ensure a fast target acquisition but you still have to focus when you aim it. However, depending on the ammo you want to use, both the accuracy and the pellet spread varies so test it out at the range to decide what works best for you. In terms of what an average Mossberg 590 price range might be, that depends on the model you are looking for and how many accessories you will want to get for it but the shotguns themselves usually cost around $500 to $600. However if you look for one on auction sites you can probably find a Mossberg 590 for sale at an even lower price depending on its features. The accessories you can add to it might set you back a few hundred dollars more if you want to customize your shotgun but the weapon itself is very affordable considering how reliable and powerful it is.

Sig HT hunting line of Solid Copper Bullet Ammunition: Now in 223 Rem and 308 Win

Sig HT hunting line of Solid Copper Bullet Ammunition: Now in 223 Rem and 308 Win

SIG SAUER, Inc. has just released SIG HT premium-grade rifle ammunition in two new calibers; 223 Rem and 308 Win. The all-copper bullet is excellent for hunting a wide variety of game and predators. It delivers deep penetration and maximum terminal ballistic performance. I got a hold of a couple of boxes of the new .308. It looks good with the copper bullets nickel cases and shoots great. The 60gr 223 Rem bullet has a muzzle velocity of 3,100 fps and muzzle energy of 1,280 ft-lbs making it an effective, hard-hitting hog, varmint and predator round. The 150gr 308 Win features a muzzle velocity of 2,900 fps and muzzle energy of 2,801 ft-lbs. This SIG HT 308 Win cartridge is excellent for mid-sized game such as deer, antelope, pigs and predators. SIG HT cartridges are made with premium nickel-plated shell cases which are slick and reduce friction for easy loading in bolt guns. Flash-reduced propellant is used to minimize visible signature while shooting in low-light situations. Premium quality primers are also used to minimize variations in velocity. All Elite Performance Ammunition is manufactured in the United States by SIG SAUER to the same exacting standards as the company’s premium pistols and rifles. In the pictures, you can see the hits on steel from my stock Remington 700 Tactical. That is a five round group from 200 yards at my club’s range. I got the ammunition earlier today and had to go to shoot for another project. I couldn’t stand it. I knew these copper bullets had great terminal ballistics, but would they hold a group.? My gun was zeroed for Sig .308 Win Match Grade 168 grain "Elite Performance Ammunition" at 200 yards. I engaged a hanging gong at 200 yards with no sight adjustment. I was easily able to hold one minute of mule deer with no sight adjustment first round hit and four more followed. The copper bullets make a distinctive splash on black painted steel. I could easily see my hits 200 yards away. Now that I have my dope, I will literately make one adjustment on my scope and take this new ammo hunting. For more information, visit www.sigsauer.com/ammunition. About SIG SAUER, Inc. SIG SAUER, Inc. is a New Hampshire-based weapons systems provider leading the industry in American innovation, ingenuity, and manufacturing. SIG SAUER®brings a dedication to superior quality, ultimate reliability, and unmatched performance that has made it the brand of choice among responsible citizens, and many of the world’s most elite military, government, and law enforcement units. As a complete systems provider, SIG SAUER offers a full array of products to meet any mission parameter, from handguns and rifles to silencers, optics, ammunition, accessories, and airguns. The largest member of a worldwide business group of firearms manufacturers that includes SIG SAUER GmbH & Co. KG in Germany and Swiss Arms AG in Switzerland, SIG SAUER is an ISO 9001: 2008 certified company with approximately1000employees. For more information on SIG SAUER, any of its products, or the SIG SAUER AcademySM, log on to www.sigsauer.com.

Gun Review: Springfield XD(m)

Gun Review: Springfield XD(m)

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379ce358f07_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379ce358f07_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The versatile Springfield XD(m) handgun provides in one package a duty pistol, a backup or concealed carry pistol and, if you so choose, a fine tool for use in IDPA or other practical shooting competitions. “Beware of the man with only one gun. He probably knows how to use it.” This old proverb was given new meaning with the creation of the Springfield Armory XD(M) 3.8 pistol. This versatile handgun provides in one package a duty pistol, a back-up or concealed carry pistol and, if you so choose, a fine tool for use in IDPA or other practical shooting competitions. Related GunDigest Articles Springfield Introduces Suppressor-Ready XD(M) Gun Review: Springfield Armory EMP 4 Gun Review: Springfield XD-S 9 FDE Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The internal changes that give the new XD(M) what Springfield Armory calls the M-factor are all well and good, but they are for the most part subtle changes that make the pistol feel and function better. What is not subtle, what jumps right out and grabs you, is the grip. Well, I guess you grab the grip, but the point is, the design of the grip and the magazine make this pistol a versatile self-defense tool capable of filling a number of roles, while at the same time allowing the shooter to maintain that level of familiarity required for consistently accurate shooting. The key element here is amazing in it simplicity. It is one of those, “Someone should have thought of this sooner,” elements that comes when designers stop and think about people’s needs. Springfield Armory built a subcompact pistol; one that is perfect for concealed carry, then added a full-sized magazine equipped with a sleeve that matches the profile of the grip frame.

.223 vs 5.56 NATO vs .223 Wylde: Will Your Gun Blow?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s What’s the difference between .223 Remington and 5.56x45mm NATO? Do you know? They’re basically the same right…or are they? Will my gun blow up if I get it wrong? We know you know…you know? It’s okay if you don’t know. You might be thinking about purchasing or building an AR-15, or even a bolt-action or single-shot rifle in one of these calibers and find yourself understandably confused . Best Complete AR-15 on a Budget Palmetto State Armory (PSA) Complete AR-15s 499 at PSA Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 499 at PSA Prices accurate at time of writing Worry not, we’re here to help. It turns out .223 Remington, 5.56×45 NATO, and even the oddball .223 Wylde have a lot in common, but the differences are important. Let’s talk about it. What is Safe, What Isn’t? .223 Chamber 5.56 NATO Chamber .223 Wylde Chamber .223 Rem Yes Yes Yes 5.56 NATO No Yes Yes So What’s the Actual Difference? In a word: pressure . Or at least the possibility of pressure. The .223 Remington was designed as a civilian cartridge but when the US military showed interest in it and after NATO started testing it – they increased the pressure of the cartridge a bit to improve reliability in the newly designed AR-15. As with many things, it’s what’s on the inside that counts.  Even though the case and projectiles may be identical, the pressure difference between .223 and 5.56 NATO makes it inadvisable to shoot the 5.56 NATO out of a .223 chamber. In a .223 chamber, the 5.56 NATO round doesn’t have that extra room to stretch its legs, and thus starts building pressure sooner.  The increased pressure creates unsafe pressures, which can cause catastrophic failure. We don’t know what happened to this AR-15, but discribing it as a “catastrophic failure” seems fitting. I don’t know about you but “catastrophic failure” isn’t a phrase I want to be associated with my firearms. Going the other way, a .223 in a 5.56 NATO chamber is 100% safe – just not as quite accurate as .223 ammo in a .223 chamber. Choosing Between the Two In years past, you had the option of getting an AR-15 in either .223 Remington or 5.56 NATO from most of the major builders – but these days, basically every AR-15 on the market is going to be in 5.56 NATO or some other cartridge entirely like 6.5 Grendel, 300 Blackout, etc. If you want a .223 Remington rifle, you’ll normally have to go bolt action or get a barrel for your AR separate from the rifle. But, why would you do that? Accuracy. Faxon 14.5 Pinned Pencil Accuracy Tests If you want a REALLY accurate rifle, then .223 is the way to go. But the applications for this rifle are normally limited to punching paper and sometimes hunting varments. For the vast majority of people, an AR-15 in 5.56 NATO is going to be the gold standard. .223 Wylde: Best of Both Worlds It really shouldn’t have taken as long as it did for somebody to look at the .223 chamber, look at the 5.56×45 chamber and go “Hey, you know what?  I can make one version that’s better than both of them.” Bill Wylde looked at the two chamberings and came up with a Goldilocks design that truly is the perfect middle-ground.  He designed a chamber with the leade angle and external dimensions of the 5.56, but the leade diameter of the .223. This gives you a chamber where the gas expansion is tight and controlled because of the smaller leade diameter of the .223, but also one you can fire 5.56 through because of the 5.56-style leade angle and length. Chamber dimensions of the .223 Rem vs 5.56 NATO vs .223 Wylde In practical terms, this means that both 5.56 NATO and .223 rem ammo perform equally well in the .223 Wylde chamber. That said…the juice isn’t really worth the squeeze. Yes, .223 Wylde is more accurate than 5.56 NATO. And yes, it can fire both .223 and 5.56 NATO completely safely. But with the ability to create sub-MOA AR-15s in 5.56 NATO, the accuracy gain presented by using .223 Wylde really isn’t very much. And almost never worth the price hike you’ll normally pay. Best .223 Remington and 5.56 NATO Ammunition First off, there is no such thing as .223 Wylde ammo. .223 Wylde ammo is kind of like the blinker fluid of the AR-15 world. With that out of the way, these are some great ammo choices for you that DO exist! 1. American Eagle XM193 55 gr A great 5.56 round that is the classic 55gr ammo, perfect for plinking, training, or taking a class with. Best 5.56 XM193 55 gr American Eagle XM193 55 gr 419 at "Palmetto State Armory" Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 419 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 2. PMC Bronze .223 55 gr Good quality .223 ammo, still plinking ammo but also good when reliability is important. PMC Bronze .223 55 gr 9.99 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 9.99 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 3. Federal Gold Match 69 gr Need .223 that is accurate? "Federal Gold Match" has you covered. They know how to make accurate ammo while still keeping the prices resonable. Federal Gold Match 69 gr 22.99 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22.99 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Writing View Details (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 4. Wolf .223 Polyformance 55 gr This is the truly budget stuff. The steel cased ammo isn’t allowed at all ranges so check the rules before bringing it out the first time. That said, it always goes bang (for us at least) and is dirt cheap. Wolf .223 Polyformance 55 gr 5.95 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 5.95 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 5. Speer Gold Dot Duty .223 55 gr Speed Gold Dot Duty is a gold standard in defensive ammunition, this is what we load in most of our home defense AR-15s. Speer Gold Dot Duty .223 55 gr 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12.75 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Parting Shots I really hope that answers all your questions about the differences between .223 Remington, 5.56×45 NATO, and .223 Wylde.  I know it’s confusing at first, especially if you’re new to the debate, but this should give you everything you need to know to choose the best chambering to meet your needs. Or you can do what I did and pick up one in each flavor and call the debate settled. Now that you know what chamber you want, take a look at our AR-15 Buyer’s Guide to choosing your rifle!

RONI Pistol Carbine : SHOT Show 2017

One of the fun toys we got to spend some time with this year at SHOT Show 2017 was the RONI Pistol Carbine by CAA. The folks from CAA are led by 19 year Israeli Defense Force, Moshe Oz and were gracious enough to take time out of their busy range session to give us a first hand look and a short explanation of the RONI Pistol Carbine and how easy the kit was to install and use. All you need is the RONI kit, some spare time and either a Generation 3 or Generation 4 Glock Model 17 pistol and you can have an affordable pistol caliber carbine that can revert back to a pistol in no time at all. Why would you want a RONI ? The RONI may or may not appeal to many shooters, but for some the allure of a pistol caliber carbine is a hard thing to shake. As we have covered in past articles a pistol caliber carbine is something that has a limited field of use but as a range gun it can be a lot of fun for shooters of all ages, especially younger ones. Younger shooters are sometimes more sensitive to the effects of recoil and tend to be more intimidated when first starting out in the shooting sports. A set up like the RONI will allow a parent to quickly yet temporarily convert their pistol to a rifle for the purpose of training sessions and allowing a child or new shooter to step their way through calibers, gradually moving upwards in terms of recoil and rapport. Not only is this effective in building a shooters confidence, it allows an instructor to be able to use cheaper pistol ammunition in the process. Building up a new shooter skill set is all about making them comfortable and exposing the shooter to more recoil at their pace. Specifications Name: RONI Pistol Carbine Manufacturer: CAA Barrel Length: 16″ Overall Length: 18.5″ Height: 5.5″ Width: 2.55″ Weight: 3.54 lbs Base Pistol: Generation 3 or 4 Glock 17 Features: Picatinny rails Detachable fore grip Extra magazine holder Ambidextrous charging handle Ambidextrous trigger guard safety Polymer & Aluminum construction Adjustable stock Adjustable cheek well Comes with 16″barrel MSRP: $592.00 Authors Photo Fellow The Arms Guide writer Travis Pike and I had a chance to put a few magazines worth of 9mm full metal jacket ammunition through the various models of RONI Pistol Carbine that were on display during Industry Day at the Range as part of SHOT Show 2017. I will say that the RONI has a ton of potential but unfortunately there are some things about it that might end up hurting its appeal to shooters in the market for a pistol caliber carbine. The Bad Cost: It’s more expensive than a new gun, and that’s a problem Test model jammed-: I know its not uncommon for guns to jam, especially at range day, but the rounds seemed to keep getting caught up in the polymer housing during ejection. Weight: at over 3.5 lbs is a bit much for an add on housing. I understand the production behind it, nothing can be done to change it 16″ Glock barrel not supported like a traditional rifle: I know its not a traditional rifle but a 16″ barrel handing out of a regular length Glock slide might make slide wear an issue. The Good: Fun to shoot: It’s expensive but its a blast to shoot. Compact size: Perfect for an ATV or truck gun Magazines: Allows a shooter to use one of the millions of Glock 17 magazines on the market including the 33 round version Picatinny Rail: Full length rail allows the mounting of inexpensive optics like Bushnell TRS 25 or Primary Arms red dots This RONI Pistol Carbine from CAA is a great idea but unfortunately in my opinion it just wont take off like it should. I think its mostly because of the cost of the unit added to the price of any Glock 17 that kills the deal. When you add the cost of the two together a person can easily go purchase any number of rifles to fill the roll the RONI is trying to fill. It’s really too bad for both shooters and the shareholders of CAA. We want to know what our readers think of the RONI Pistol Carbine, is it a viable option for a truck gun or a range toy ? Rick Feature Photo Courtesy: www.usacaagearup.com Authors Photo: TAG Writer Travis Pike getting some range time with the RONI

Summary

Lots of conjecture out their about magazine monopodding. There is plenty of debate over whether it will cause magazine related stoppages. I found, with my two rifles, that the issue of stoppages could be related to not only the rifle, but the brand of magazines.